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How Product Line Engineering (PLE) Creates a Competitive Advantage

How Product Line Engineering (PLE) Creates a Competitive Advantage: Removing Time, Cost, and Complexity from the Systems Lifecycle discusses the growing importance of embedded software in today's products and the resulting complexity. The report highlights the negative impacts of not managing this complexity. … [ read more ]

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Getting Started with PDM (animation)

This short Tech-Clarity TV animation explains how manufacturers can get started with Product Data Management. The video offers findings from The Business Value of Product Data Management that finds that manufacturers can get off to a fast start with preconfigured solutions but still leave themselves room to … [ read more ]

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Webinar: Addressing Bottlenecks in Simulation

Michelle Boucher will share her recent research on Simulation Bottlenecks during a webinar on Thursday September 29 at 2:00 EDT. Digital Engineering's Kenneth Wong will moderate this webinar sponsored by Siemens Femap. This webinar will reveal: The top improvement areas you should focus on to get even … [ read more ]

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Survey: Composites for A&D

Are you in the aerospace and defense industry (A&D) or a supplier for A&D? Do you work with composites? If so, please share your experience with composites by participating in this research and completing the survey. We are exploring topics such as: what is the material make-up of your parts?Are … [ read more ]

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Composite State of the Market (Survey Findings)

Tech-Clarity's research report, Composites State of the Market: Using Composites as a Competitive Advantage, examines survey findings on material trends and composites. Over 240 companies participated in the survey. The research finds that new materials are a significant source of product complexity. The research … [ read more ]

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Factory Change ThumbBest Practices for Factory Adaptability

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Tech-Clarity-Perspective-Factory-AdaptabilityTech-Clarity Perspective: Best Practices for Factory Adaptability – Top Performers Implement Change Faster and More Confidently shares survey results from over 250 manufacturers examining how they implement change in their factories. The study reviews the practices of the “top performers,” those that implement change more effectively in their plants, to determine best practice processes and technology for engineering change management.

Please enjoy the summary below, or click the report to download a PDF overview (free of charge, no registration required).

For the full report, please visit Autodesk’s Factory Design Software Page (free of charge, no registration required). Note: The link isn’t instantly evident, look for the “become a top performer” section that looks like the thumbnail below.

Factory Design Software | Factory Planning | Autodesk

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

  • Executive Overview
  • Adapt or Die: The Change Imperative
  • The Constancy of Change
  • Challenges Managing Change in the Factory
  • Business Impacts Encountered during Factory Change
  • Identifying the Top Performers
  • Top Performers Demonstrate Advantages in Adaptability
  • Top Performers Adhere to more Formal Change Processes
  • Best Practices followed by the Top Performers
  • Top Performers Demonstrate better Operational Capabilities
  • Top Performer Software Capabilities
  • Top Performer Software Enablers
  • Conclusion
  • Recommendations
  • About the Author
  • About the Research

Executive Overview

Manufacturers must adapt quickly to compete in today’s fast-moving, competitive, global markets. They must be agile to take advantage of opportunities and sidestep competitive threats. They have to be able to confidently implement quality, efficiency, and cost improvements resulting from Lean Manufacturing initiatives.

There are a multitude of business drivers that demand change in the factory, ranging from tactical “tweaks” to strategic, market-facing overhauls like introducing new products or product lines. Unfortunately, the old adage that “change is hard” is very true in the factory. Manufacturers face numerous challenges adapting to change. These difficulties result in significant, negative business impacts, including:

  • Project impacts including cost overruns, unplanned labor, and missed due dates
  • Outcome-related impacts including poor product quality and low productivity

Changing the factory is complex and brings a lot of risk and uncertainty, but it is essential for survival. Change is simultaneously a harsh reality to deal with and the source of adaptability to differentiate and compete. It’s important for manufacturers to make change management a core competency to avoid disruption while adapting to achieve intended benefits.

To determine best practices to manage change, Tech-Clarity analyzed survey responses from over 250 manufacturers to understand how they approach change in the factory. The analysis separated respondents into two performance bands based on their ability to hit targets for five change-related metrics. The “Top Performers” were identified as those that are able to meet project budgets, deadlines, resulting production rates, resulting quality, and agility (measured as time to implement changes) better than their competitors. Then, researchers analyzed the processes, organizational structure, capabilities, and enabling software used in order to determine what the Top Performers do differently than “Others.”

The research shows that Top Performers are able to implement change more predictably. They are better at hitting target budgets and due dates on their change initiatives, and are better at achieving the desired outcome of their change. Specifically they come 25% closer to hitting their target production volume. Although they are still subject to risk and uncertainty, the Top Performers are in better control of their change management process and can implement changes faster and more confidently. This is particularly true for larger changes, where “getting it right” up front is critical because brute force can’t make up for poor planning.  How do they do this? Three themes emerged from reviewing their responses:

  • Top Performers are much better at understanding the full scope and impact of changes during the planning phase. To achieve this, they leverage processes and technologies that allow them to determine the impact of planned changes, simulate changes before they are implemented, and use some emerging capabilities including reality capture and electronically visualizing changes in the context of the existing factory
  • Top Performers communicate and collaborate more effectively, sharing processes and information across departments. They accomplish this through organizational approaches such as cross-functional teams and change control boards (CCB), processes to share status and information, and technologies that provide online collaboration and a central repository for manufacturing and project information including BIM, PLM, and project management
  • Top performers adhere to more formal processes, including formal change management processes, six sigma for change, and formal requirements and impact analysis

 

Comments

  1. Chris Smith says:

    “Change is simultaneously a harsh reality to deal with and the source of adaptability to differentiate and compete” I couldnt agree more!

    In order for an initiative to gain momentum and enter actual practice and application, you have to overcome some serious human elements, as well as implement a strategy that works well with the time allotted….
    I wrote a post on Change management best practice highliting this here: http://change.walkme.com/change-initiative-in-organizations-best-practices/

    Cheers,
    Chris@walkme

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