Industrial designIndustrial Design: 7 Ways to Reduce Non-Value-Added Work (survey results)

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Industrial designHow much of your industrial design work can be leveraged during detail design? Could your products be even better if you had more time to get concepts right by reducing non-value-added work?

An overwhelming 76% of manufacturers agree that spending more time on concept and industrial design would improve products. Unfortunately, industrial designers waste significant time on non-value-added work, which holds them back. Read our eBook, Seven Ways to Reduce Non-Valued-Added Work in Industrial Design to learn how to reduce wasted effort so that Industrial Designs can work more efficiently to help your company develop even better products. You will also learn way to improve collaboration between industrial designers and design engineers.

Please enjoy the summary below.* For the full report, please visit our sponsor Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS (registration required).

For related research, please read our eBook, How to Reduce Non-Valued-Added Work in Engineering to learn more about how to reduce wasted effort and increase focus on value-added engineering and innovation work.

Table of Contents

  • Industrial designExecutive Summary
  • Importance of Concept and Industrial Design
  • Identifying Top Performers
  • Strategies to Reduce Non-Value-Added Work
  • 1. Improve Efficiency with a Single Solution
  • 2. Support Reuse by Leveraging the Concept during Detail Design
  • 3. Enable Easy Iterations
  • 4. Facilitate Internal Feedback
  • 5. Solicit Customer Feedback
  • 6. Select an Ideal Solution
  • 7. Tie it Together on a Platform
  • Recommendations
  • About the Research
  • Acknowledgments

Executive Summary

Reducing Non-Value-Added Work

An overwhelming 76% of manufacturers agree that spending more time on concept and industrial design would improve products. Unfortunately, industrial designers waste significant time on non-value-added work, which holds them back. Further, detail designers waste even more time recreating industrial design details. Reducing this non-value-added work could help a company get to market faster, optimize profitability, maximize revenue potential, and offer more competitive offerings.

Interestingly, 99% say that technology should play a role in limiting this non-value-added work. Moreover, the research identified key ways technology can help.

Seven Practices

This report reveals seven practices that will reduce non-value-added work in industrial design:

  • Use a single solution to support industrial and detail design.
  • Leverage more of the concept model during detail design.
  • Streamline design iterations between industrial and detail design.
  • Facilitate internal feedback with more efficient design reviews.
  • Involve customers as early as possible.
  • Ensure your solution meets the unique needs of industrial designers.
  • Tie everything together with a cloud platform.

Other Key Findings

The research also revealed several other interesting findings, including:

  • 95% of Top Performers who use a single solution for both industrial and detail design rate their remodeling process as ‘excellent’ or ‘very good.’
  • 71% of industrial designers say it would save time if customers could provide more feedback early on.
  • Industrial designers identify the top quality of an ideal industrial design solution as one that supports both subdivision and parametric modeling.

Industrial Design

Recommendations

Recommendations and Next Steps

Based on industry experience and research for this report, Tech-Clarity offers the following recommendations:

  • Investments to improve the efficiency of industrial and concept design can offer a competitive advantage.
  • Consider a single solution to support industrial and detail design so that rather than wasting time importing, exporting, fixing, and recreating data, designers can spend more time on critical design work.
  • Ensure that detail designers can reuse as much of the concept design as possible. Reinventing the wheel by recreating design details already in the concept model wastes their time. Instead, they could use that time to innovate, improve product quality, or beat deadlines to get to market faster.
  • Reduce barriers to iterations so industrial and detail designers can remodel the design as needed to improve upon ideas, implement engineering changes, or fix manufacturability issues. When their work is siloed, iterations involve importing and exporting data, which wastes hours.
  • Improve the timeliness of internal feedback with more streamlined ways to solicit feedback and more efficient design reviews. Real-time visibility to design progress on a single, integrated design collaboration platform can improve collaboration to efficiently collect feedback.
  • Involve customers as early as possible to provide feedback to help ensure your product aligns with customer needs.
  • When selecting a single solution for industrial and detail design, ensure it supports both subdivision and parametric modeling.
  • Tie everything together with a cloud platform so that you have the infrastructure to support better collaboration, and designers can access the software capabilities they need on the hardware they prefer.

*This summary is an abbreviated version of the ebook and does not contain the full content. For the full report, please visit our sponsor Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS

If you have difficulty obtaining a copy of the research, please contact us.